NAPC Young Adult, Rebecca Gieseking, featured in the AJC

NAPC Young Adult, Rebecca Gieseking, brings together her childhood hobby of Origami to create complex pieces of art utilizing science and art.

http://www.myajc.com/news/news/local/real-people-chemistry-student-finds-stress-relief-/ngcmQ/

Here’s a post from Rev. Jeff celebrating National Puppy Day…and prayer. 

spiritualityofdogwalking:

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In honor of last Sunday’s National Puppy Day, I want to ask a question that every true dog lover has asked at one point: What separates humans, Homo sapiens, from animals, like puppies?

Aristotle asked this question and concluded, with much of subsequent Christian theology following…

Here’s another post from Rev. Jeff on prayer. 

spiritualityofdogwalking:

As a preacher, I love talking. So it’s probably no surprise that I used to have the same opinion of Alison Krauss’s relationship advice (“You say it best when you say nothing at all”) as I did about contemplative prayer – that it sounded really, really boring.

For years I approached…

spiritualityofdogwalking:

One of the most seemingly impractical, if not simply avoided, doctrines of Christian theology, the Trinity, becomes of the most practical importance when it comes to prayer.

While many religious and spiritual people may pray, Christians have a distinctive understanding of what’s happening in…

Here are some thoughts on fasting and Lent from Rev. Jeff:

spiritualityofdogwalking:

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Richard Foster, one of the people most responsible for the resurgence in the practice of spiritual disciplines, defines fasting as “the voluntary denial of a normal function for the sake of intense spiritual activity.” Therefore, fasting is not done as an end in itself, but is done with…

Why do we pray? (Part three)

Here’s another post from Jeff:

spiritualityofdogwalking:

In his famous commencement speech at Kenyon College, David Foster Wallace told a joke about three fish: Two younger fish are swimming along when an older fish comes by and asks, “Morning boys, how’s the water?” The two younger fish swim on for a bit until one of them turns to the other and asks, “What the hell is water?”

When it comes to God, we are often like those two fish.

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Theologians use the mighty metaphysical terms of omnipresence, omniscience, and omnipotence to describe how God surrounds us in terms of space, time, and power. In other words, we are the fish, and God is the water. And just as fish have no idea what it would be like to live without water, we also have no experience of what it would be like to live without God.

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A post from Jeff from his series on the why’s, what’s, how’s, and who’s of prayer:

spiritualityofdogwalking:

In my last post I dodged the central issue at stake in prayer: if God is already going to do something, how does my prayer actually change things? Sure, I might say, God may want to know me personally, but does my prayer actually affect the state of the world?

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The short answer, first…

Young Adults befriend international students

Here is an introduction to a new ministry started by NAPC young adults this year. Read how Mitch’s own experience as an outsider in Slovenia led him to reach out to outsiders here in Atlanta. 

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Several years ago I was in Bled—a town in Slovenia—trying to take a bus to get to the train station. I carefully studied the schedules posted at the stop and, having gleaned no knowledge from the cryptic Slovenian tables, boarded the bus that felt luckiest. As we approached the outskirts of town 20 minutes later, I decided to ask one of the other passengers whether our bus was going to the train station. “The next stop,” I interpreted her hand gestures to mean. I briefly relaxed before the driver merged onto the freeway and headed toward the capital city of Ljubljana, an hour’s drive away! Of course, the driver was not going to turn around just because one American’s mistake caused him to miss his train. Now I look back and laugh, but at the time I had never felt less at home.

Even simple tasks can demand a great deal of effort in an unfamiliar country. Imagine all the questions you would have if you were interviewing for a job, signing up for health care, doing your taxes, or applying for college scholarships somewhere abroad. These are some of the challenges faced by our brothers and sisters from all over the world who now reside in metro Atlanta. 

In the fall of last year, the young adult community at NAPC contacted World Relief and, through them, began a partnership with Emmanuel International Church near Clarkston. Robin H. says, “EIC is a vibrant church community made up of primarily ethnic-Nepali Bhutanese refugees. The congregation is growing, and it’s clear the Holy Spirit is at work among them.” EIC has outgrown its location and moved three times since it was established in 2009. The pastor, Silas T., alongside some representatives from World Relief, discussed with several NAPC young adults the makeup of the EIC congregation, which includes about 40 youth. These young students will soon be navigating the waters of adult life in the United States, a challenging prospect for anyone who did not grow up here. “As the form of the mentoring program evolved in conversations with the leadership at [EIC], they repeatedly told us that they wanted us to emphasize the importance of schooling and education with their youth,” Michael P. recalls from the meetings. 

At the same time, the group from NAPC was hearing a call to come alongside high school students to be encouragers and friends. 

Out of these discussions, the ongoing mentoring program was born.

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In this first year, we paired two young adults from NAPC with two to three members of the EIC youth group. Each month, those small groups of four or five get together for an afternoon. Some might take a walk in the park, some might go to a movie, or some might play soccer. We also plan a monthly activity for all the EIC youth and NAPC participants together. Recently, we hosted a “career day” featuring a panel of five young adults who answered questions about what they did at their job, what sort of education was necessary, how to get started in those careers, and what kinds of scholarships or assistance was available. But it’s not all business—we hosted a big Thanksgiving dinner that filled the international classroom to capacity and had many of our students come to the recent Derek Webb concert! We are also planning a cross-cultural etiquette night, volunteer activities, and some events at EIC.

We don’t expect to get everything right the first time, but as we go forward, we hope that God will grow this friendship and teach us more about how to locate our center not in our comfort zones but in Christ. 

Blessings,

Mitch

Why do we pray? (part 1)

spiritualityofdogwalking:

Last Sunday night we hosted a prayer service where we took time to pray for our social spaces, our city, and our world. image

At the service there was one woman, a doctoral student from China, who told the folks in her prayer group that it was the very first time she had ever prayed. Ever. Having grown up in a Christian family praying for everything from meals to parking spaces, I can’t for the life of me remember my first prayer. 

I sometimes take it for granted, but there is an obvious, and often never-stated, question regarding prayer: if God already knows what God is going to do in the future, what does prayer actually do?

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Next Tuesday, Josh Schicker along with Lindsay Allward, Sam Yenn Batah, Michael Kurth, and others, will be performing  at 8 p.m. at Eddie’s Attic. If you’ve never heard Josh play his own stuff live, you definitely don’t want to miss it — he puts on a great show. You can purchase tickets in advance for $8 here: http://www.eddiesattic.com/?event=josh-schicker-and-jon-troast (they are $12 at the door).